50 Shades of Gray?! More Like 500!

And you all thought 50 shades was a lot, can you imagine 500?  Well that’s what it feels like these last few days before Spring gets sprung.  The dreary gray world seems to be dragging on and so is our mood.

It’s come to be recognized as a very real disorder affecting people’s lives, seasonal affective disorder.  Some of us are just more sensitive to the lack of sun and constant blah that we see all around us.  Some of us can’t hardly stand the nearly non-stop dark and cold.  What is most likely the reason some are effected more than others, they are Vitamin D deficient.   Vitamin D is recognized as the greatest vitamin deficiency disease in the world!  Vitamin D deficiency is often misdiagnosed as fibromyelgia and chronic fatigue syndrome.

imagesVitamin D, which also acts as a hormone in the body, is important for the absorption of calcium and phosphorous.  Vitamin D is best aided in absorption by magnesium and then zinc.  So don’t fear if you aren’t able, or wanting to, get Vitamin D from dairy.

Vitamin D does way more than help you absorb your calcium though.  It is very important in the building and repairing of the human body.  It helps to regulate your immune system, while also being proven to reduce the severity of asthma and reduce the risk of rheumatoid arthritis particularly in women.  Proper levels of Vitamin D are shown to help lower the risk of developing cancer and the risk of heart attack.  Some of the every day good stuff it brings us…it’s linked to help maintaining healthy body weights, reducing inflammation in the body (that may be created from other foods you are eating), and better brian function.

Vitamin D sources are often thought of as milk or dairy, and sunlight.  The world of foods fortified with Vitamin D are exploding.  It’s added to milks and cereals, orange juices and even breads.   With more and more people becoming sensitive or allergic to dairy, mostly because of the factory farming practices (for another time), and the heavy use of sunblock, the food industry is desperately trying to find places to insert this new super vitamin.

I’m sure it goes without saying that I’m not going to recommend you boost your Vitamin D intake through fortified, processed foods.  I caution you taking a vitamin or supplement of Vitamin D.  Do your research.  Many brands are so highly processed they are barely beneficial and more a waste of money.  If you truly believe you may be severely deficient, you can go to your doctor and receive prescription Vitamin D shots or capsules.

Mother Nature has our backs though.  It’s amazing how nature knew to pair foods with both the magnesium and Vitamin D together, and even a spot of zinc in many, so that it can work the best.  There are plenty of natural sources for us to choose.

First and foremost…oily fish (wild fish, not farm raised).  All kinds of fish and mollusks are some of the highest sources of Vitamin D.  This includes canned tunas, oysters, salmon and cod liver oil.  Mushrooms, egg yolks and beef liver are also sources of Vitamin D.

The body can produce its own Vitamin D through a process of absorbing the sunlight through our skin.  Sunlight is the highest source of Vitamin D we come in contact with.   The Vitamin D that comes from sunlight can be stored in body fat for absorption during the darkest times of the year.  It’s important to note though that people who have too much body fat will not be able to release as much as needed.  The extra fat works as a barrier.  So more fat does not mean more storage…sorry.

Screw the gray!  No doubt we are at least a little deficient in Vitamin D by now?!

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